Where are they now?

P1080824 In this post, you can see where former graduate student and postdoctoral members of our lab have ended up. Although all graduate students have been American or Canadian (and settled in North America), half of the past postdocs have been European and found their way back home. Click on the flags to find their name, location, and website! //Call initMap.… Read more

Remembrances of the last ESA meeting (2017)

2 I am sorry to miss this year’s Ecological Society of America meeting, currently ongoing in New Orleans. I lieu of ESA, next week I will be presenting at the International Society of Chemical Ecology meeting in Budapest. In addition, I am happy to report that Paul Metzler has produced a comic about last year’s meeting… one highlight is below.… Read more

On the gift of sabbatical – A view from final days studying monarchs and milkweeds in Mexico (Part V)

bvine3 Sabbatical is one of those remarkable gifts of the academy. At Cornell University, after 12 semesters of service on campus, one can apply for 1-2 semesters off campus, free from most administrative and teaching duties to focus on scholarship.  This year has been my third sabbatical, and every one seems better than the last.  I was unquestionably able to commune… Read more

Monarchs & Milkweed in Mexico – Part IV

aFrida Art, biodiversity, chilies, Danaus, and extremes… that’s what I’ve found on sabbatical here in Oaxaca.This is Part IV in my series from Mexico where I am based on sabbatical leave from Cornell (click here for the 3rd post). I’m following up on my recent book Monarchs and Milkweeds: A migrating butterfly, a poisonous plant, and their remarkable story of coevolution. … Read more

Monarchs & Milkweed in Mexico – Pt III

alban 1 Greetings monarch and milkweed enthusiasts from Oaxaca! This is Part III in my series from Mexico where I am based on sabbatical leave from Cornell (see the second post here). This post follows up on observations here that are laying the foundation for my next research and writing projects, continuing on from my recent book Monarchs and Milkweeds.
I recently
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Q&A about research funding to study monarch butterflies

blip Continuing with Q&A from insightful readers: Chris Padgett of Louisville, KY, recently wrote: “Hello, I recently read your book. I’m curious, is Monsanto or a think tank funded by their industry funding your work? I ask because I find it interesting you suggest GMOs and pesticides are not harming the Monarchs. Hearing you say this in various interviews on YouTube,… Read more

Q&A with a textbook author

c Every couple of weeks I get a very interesting email message from somebody out there who has thought deeply about monarchs and milkweed.  Especially since these exchanges can be insightful and relevant to questions others may be asking, I have decided to start sharing some of these exchanges. Below is a wonderful message from a freelance writer, William Hoover, of … Read more

Monarchs and Milkweed from Mexico Part II

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Monarch and Milkweed Ornament, by Cornell University undergraduate: Shujie (Silvia) Li
Hello from Oaxaca!  A few updates on monarchs and milkweed, February 2018… Click here for my photo blog on Monarchs and Milkweed in Mexico Part II Listen to this new podcast and interview about monarchs and milkweed on Brad Grim’s Grow Milkweed forum. See this great book review in… Read more

Monarchs & Milkweed in Mexico – Pt 1

diabrotica I am getting settled in Oaxaca, on sabbatical leave from Cornell studying milkweeds and monarchs in Mexico. Here is my initial report on plants and insects from the first couple of weeks. The people, culture, food, and biodiversity have all met my expectations so far. What a great country!  This is providing inspiration for the next chapter of what I… Read more

Monarchs and Milkweed – update

NOBAWin250  
National Outdoor Book Award!
A brief update on Monarchs and Milkweed from Montana, Dec. 2017. Monarchs and Milkweed has received the National Outdoor Book Award in the Nature and Environment Category. Here is a fabulous book review of M&M written for the scientific journal Ecology written by Kelly Nail. And finally, M&M made the top 10 list for the… Read more

Different pesticides as insect killers

blip   I recently came across a new study by a group of friends and colleagues that blew me away.  Of all the environmental pollutants and nasty things we use to kill pests, who knew that fungicides (chemicals used to kill fungus) would become a problem for bumblebee pollinators. This study: McArt, S. H., C. M. Urbanowicz, S. McCoshum, R. E.… Read more

Who was James A. Perkins?

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James Perkins
I just received word from the Dean’s office in CALS that I have been appointed the James A. Perkins Professor of Environmental Studies at Cornell!  This is a huge honor, and I am thrilled and excited. Embarrassingly enough, I didn’t know who he was. J.A. Perkins, who passed away 20 years ago, was the 7th President of Cornell. … Read more

Second graders do science!

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Second grade kids at the Belle Sherman elementary school.  Learning about scientific hypotheses and data collection!
Science education should start early!  And as part of our collaborative NSF grant on milkweed genetics and ecology (with Georg Jander from BTI and Steve Broyles from Suny Cortland), we are implementing outreach projects in the K-12 Ithaca schools.  Led by research support specialist,… Read more

Monarch-milkweed happenings from Montana

1 Things are going well on the sabbatical in Missoula, MT!  On November 9th I will be speaking at a “friend-raiser” associated with the Montana Natural History Center and the Missoula Insectarium. And in December I will be speaking at Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum. Both talks will give an overview of monarchs and milkweed and an update on their current predicament. I… Read more

New study on monarch declines

mon ellen An excellent new study finds that climate, habitat loss (in both Mexico and the USA), disease, & insecticides contribute to decline of monarch butterflies.  Although one could quibble with the emphasis placed on discussion of various issues, what I appreciate is the quantitative nature and comprehensiveness of the study, and the attempt to include as many factors as possible.  Perhaps… Read more

Summer 2017 news & happenings

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Anurag chatting with Michael Polan after his Iscol Lecture in April 2017.
Anurag and Jennifer are off for sabbatical for the 2017-18 academic year… but science in the lab continues.  As a wrap-up, here are some news and happenings from the summer months… Congrats to Jacob and Katie for passing their A-Exams with flying colors (see previous post on their… Read more

Milkweeds (and monarchs) across the middle of America

29 IO On July 24th 2017, I set out with my family from Ithaca, NY, for year-long sabbatical leave from Cornell University.  Our destination for the fall semester is Missoula, Montana, but our first major stop was a family visit in Urbana, IL.  Given my travel companions, especially the kids Jasper (12) and Anna (8), we decided to take our time driving… Read more

New synthesis of convergent evolution!

solanum dulcamara As part of being the Vice President of the American Society of Naturalists, I had the opportunity to organize a symposium at the annual meeting in 2016 (Austin, TX).  The topic was convergence, natural history, and the big questions in biology.  The talks were great, and what I think (hope!) will really have an impact on the field is this… Read more

Summer in the milkweed patch

11 It’s peak season for milkweed and the village of insects that make milkweed its home.  In my book on Monarchs and Milkweed, I devote an entire chapter to these diverse and fascinating other milkweed insects.  Below are photos from two days last week (July 6 and 7th), one set from my front yard and the other from Shawangunk National Grassland… Read more

A conversation with Paul Feeny

paul I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Paul Feeny, one of the all-time great scientists who studies plant-herbivores interactions.  Paul has been at Cornell since 1967, and was one of the founders of the discipline of chemical ecology.  Over the years Paul has had many successful students, he taught a range of courses, and contributed to the communal… Read more

Thanks to undergraduate researchers!

lab with undergrads 2017 Our lab always has a cadre of excellent undergraduate researchers.  This academic year was especially great as five students engaged in various projects from the study of bumble bee foraging and learning to mechanisms of toxicity in the Malagasy stem-succulent genus Pachypodium.  We are proud of and grateful to all of you… and best wishes to our two graduates, Aliya… Read more

Popping the cork!

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Marc Lajeunesse – Dissertation cork, 2008.  In introducing Marc at his defense talk, I referred to him as my Dick Cheney.
A long-held tradition in E&EB at Cornell (and probably at most institutions) is that of popping a cork when graduate students meet particular milestones. The bubbly can take many forms, from Champagne to sparkling water.  For us, the most… Read more

PIG Spring 2017

P1080824 Thanks to all for another great semester of the plant-interactions group!
PIG Spring 2017.  Top Row, in Geneva, NY: Matt, Max, Kyle, Charlie, and Mike.                                       Back Row: Todd, Andre, Katja, Patty, Nick, Greggor, and Scott.                                                                         Middle row: Dongyan, Jennifer, Mia, Lauren, Zoe, and Heather.                                                                       Front row: Natasha, Renee, Amy, Lina, Katie, Jacob and Anurag.
   … Read more